Prizes

The Laboratory Astrophysics Division (LAD) of the American Astronomical Society (AAS) awards three prizes:

The Laboratory Astrophysics Prize is presented, normally on an annual basis, to an individual who has made significant contributions to laboratory astrophysics over an extended period of time. The prize includes a cash award, a framed certificate, and an invited lecture by the recipient at a meeting of the Laboratory Astrophysics Division.

The Early Career Award is presented, normally on an annual basis, to an individual who has made a significant contribution to laboratory astrophysics early in their professional career. Nominees must have no more than 10 years of professional experience since their PhD or equivalent degree, as of the end of the year of the award. The award includes a check, a framed certificate, and an invited lecture by the recipient at a meeting of the Laboratory Astrophysics Division.

The Dissertation Prize is presented, normally on an annual basis, to recognize an outstanding doctoral dissertation (or the equivalent) in laboratory astrophysics. The prize is awarded to an individual who has completed their Ph.D. or equivalent degree in any of the three calendar years immediately preceding the award year. The prize includes a cash award, a citation, and an invited lecture by the recipient at a meeting of the Division.

LAD Prize News

LAD is pleased to announce its award recipients for 2016. The 2016 Laboratory Astrophysics Prize goes to Dr. Peter Beiersdorfer of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), California, for his numerous contributions to the study of astronomical environments at extreme-ultraviolet and X-ray wavelengths. The inaugural LAD Early Career Award goes to Dr. Fran├žois Lique of the University of Le Havre, France, for his numerous contributions to the study of interstellar processes through theoretical calculations of rate coefficients for the collisional excitation of interstellar molecules by the most abundant neutral species.