You are here

Prizes

The Laboratory Astrophysics Division (LAD) of the American Astronomical Society (AAS) awards three prizes, each of which recognizes outstanding theoretical or experimental research in laboratory astrophysics:

The Laboratory Astrophysics Prize is presented, normally on an annual basis, to an individual who has made significant theoretical or experimental contributions to laboratory astrophysics over an extended period of time. The prize includes a cash award, a framed certificate, and an invited lecture by the recipient at a meeting of the Laboratory Astrophysics Division.

The Early Career Award is presented, normally on an annual basis, to an individual who has made a significant theoretical or experimental contribution to laboratory astrophysics early in their professional career. Nominees must have no more than 10 years of professional experience since their PhD or equivalent degree, as of the end of the year of the award. The award includes a check, a framed certificate, and an invited lecture by the recipient at a meeting of the Division.

The Dissertation Prize is presented, normally on an annual basis, to recognize an outstanding theoretical or experimental doctoral dissertation (or the equivalent) in laboratory astrophysics. The prize is awarded to an individual who has completed their PhD or equivalent degree in any of the three calendar years immediately preceding the award year. The prize includes a cash award, a framed certificate, and an invited lecture by the recipient at a meeting of the Division.

2022 LAD Prize Recipients

The LAD Laboratory Astrophysics Prize goes to Dr. Evelyne Roueff  in recognition of an outstanding career devoted to the theoretical investigation of the spectroscopic and collisional properties of molecules in astronomical environments.

The LAD Early Career Award goes to Professor Kyle Crabtree recognition of his use of high-resolution spectroscopy to study reactive molecules of astrophysical interest.

2021 LAD Prize Recipients

The LAD Diessertation Prize goes to Dr. Jennifer Bergner for the discovery of new, cold pathways to complex molecule formation and for creative, interdisciplinary explorations of the origins of organic molecules during planet formation.