Prizes

2016 

The Laboratory Astrophysics Division (LAD) of the American Astronomical Society (AAS) announces two awards for 2016. 

The Laboratory Astrophysics Prize is presented, normally on an annual basis, to an individual who has made significant contributions to Laboratory Astrophysics over an extended period of time.  The prize will include a cash award, a citation, and an invited lecture by the recipient at a meeting of the Laboratory Astrophysics Division.

The Early Career Award is presented, normally on an annual basis, to an individual in recognition of a significant contribution to Laboratory Astrophysics early in a person's professional career.  Nominees must have no more than ten years of professional experience since their Ph.D or equivalent degree, at the end of the year of the award.  The award will include a cash award, a citation, and an invited lecture by the recipient at a meeting of the Laboratory Astrophysics Division.

The recipients for 2016 will be announced in Fall 2015 and the presentation made at the 2016 LAD meeting.  Any nominee not selected will be automatically considered in the next two consecutive years, or as long as the nominee is eligible, whichever is less.

The nomination package must include a one-page narrative description of the significant aspects of the nominee's career, a curriculum vitae, a publication list, and any other material that the nominators think will be helpful.  Nominators must also request two additional supporting reference letters from knowledgeable colleagues.  Nominators, letter writers, and candidates need not be AAS or LAD members.  The deadline for receipt of the nomination package and supporting letters is Monday 07 September 2015.

All nomination material should be sent by the deadline directly to the LAD Secretary (ladsec@aas.org).


2015 

The Laboratory Astrophysics Division (LAD) of the American Astronomical Society (AAS) announces its inaugural prize 

INAUGURAL LABORATORY ASTROPHYSICS PRIZE GOES TO LOUIS ALLAMANDOLA  

The Laboratory Astrophysics Division (LAD) of the American Astronomical Society (AAS) is pleased to announce the awarding of its inaugural Laboratory Astrophysics Prize to Dr. Louis Allamandola of NASA's Ames Research Center in Moffett Field, California. Dr. Allamandola is cited "for his numerous contributions to the study of ices and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in astronomical environments."

Dr. Allamandola pioneered techniques to reproduce conditions on comets and planets and in interstellar space, where stars and planets are forming today. A major focus of his research involves characterizing the infrared signatures of ices and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, or PAHs, complex molecules made of rings of carbon and hydrogen. His studies of ices have revealed the rich chemistry that can take place in the harsh environments of space. His work on PAHs has led to a reevaluation of the physical and chemical processes occurring in space.

Dr. Allamandola received his PhD in chemistry from the University of California, Berkeley. His previous honors include Fellowship in the American Physical Society and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He held the 2013 Oort Professorship at Leiden University in the Netherlands and has received many NASA awards, most recently the NASA Exceptional Scientific Achievement Medal and the honor of being named NASA Ames Fellow. He also received the Presidential Rank Award for Meritorious Public Service in 2006 and 2014. He has trained several graduate students who have gone on to prominent careers in astrophysics.

The LAD plans to award the Laboratory Astrophysics Prize annually to an individual who has made significant contributions to laboratory astrophysics over an extended period of time. The prize will include a cash award, a citation, and an invited lecture by the recipient at a meeting of the Laboratory Astrophysics Division.

Contacts:
Steven Federman
LAD Chair / University of Toledo, Ohio
+1 (419) 530-2652
ladchair@aas.org

Daniel Wolf Savin
LAD Secretary / Columbia University, New York
+1 (212) 854-4124
ladsec@aas.org

Louis J. Allamandola
NASA Ames Research Center, California
+1 (650) 604-6890
louis.j.allamandola@nasa.gov

The LAD (http://lad.aas.org) advances our understanding of the universe through the promotion of fundamental theoretical and experimental research into the underlying processes that drive the cosmos.

The AAS (http://aas.org), established in 1899 and based in Washington, DC, is the major organization of professional astronomers in North America. The mission of the AAS is to enhance and share humanity's scientific understanding of the universe.